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Ethical Leadership of the Successor Subsequent to the Ethical Failure of the Predecessor: Creating an Organizational Phoenix Open Access

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ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION Ethical Leadership of the Successor Subsequent to the Ethical Failure of the Predecessor: Creating an Organizational PhoenixThere is an inordinate amount of literature regarding the organizational differences between leaders and managers, such as, leaders advocate change while managers maintain the status quo. There is also a plethora of literature on different leadership styles, e.g., transactional, transformational, leader-member exchange (LMX), situational leadership, and recently, spiritual and paternalistic leadership. Additionally, there is literature about how leaders are developed, or even if they have traits which are inherited. However, there does not appear to be a corresponding amount of research regarding how these leaders promote the importance of ethical leadership and decision-making, irrespective of their unique leadership style.In both the private and public sectors, there are recurring organizational leadership malfeasances or ethical transgressions, and it is important that researchers extend their line of inquiry to a multitude of perspectives of organizational ethical culture---from leading and assessing, to transforming an unethical environment through ethical decision-making. While surveys and other forms of measurement may be used to assess an organization's ethicality, this research identifies ethical decision-making and role-modeling behaviors to guide Chief Executive Officers to cultivate an ethical organizational culture through their leadership.

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