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Speech-Language Pathologists' Self-Reported Definition of Cluttering and Confidence in Assessment of Cluttering Open Access

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This study investigated speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') definition of cluttering based on the individual features of cluttering, and their confidence in assessment of those individual features as well as their overall confidence in assessment, diagnosis and treatment of cluttering. Within the field of speech-language pathology there is not an agreed upon definition of cluttering or a standard method of evaluation and treatment of the disorder. Relative to other speech and language disorders, cluttering has a very low prevalence, and is not found on the caseload of many SLPs'. Eight-eight SLPs completed a survey comprised of open-ended questions, questions on a modified 7-point Likert scale and demographic questions. These questions were used to determine their definition of cluttering based on the features of cluttering (as determined by the published literature on cluttering) and their self-reported confidence in assessment of the individual features of cluttering and their overall confidence in assessment, diagnosis and treatment of cluttering. There was a positive relationship between SLPs' definition of cluttering and the current cluttering literature as well as a significant difference between SLPs' self-reported confidence in assessment of the individual features of cluttering and cluttering overall. Self-reported years experience was correlated with overall confidence in assessment, diagnosis and treatment of cluttering, however the correlations were weak. These results support the need for continuing education on cluttering, and the need for a standard method of evaluation of cluttering.

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