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First Palestinian Intifada: Does Political Affiliation or Imprisonment Moderate the Negative Psychological Effects for Adolescents Exposed to Violence? Open Access

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Hundreds of thousands of adolescents confronted war and political violence in many countries all over the world. Despite calls to refine and perform sophisticated studies on this special population had been made a decade ago, the knowledge base remained limited. This study was designed to investigate whether political affiliation or political imprisonment moderated the relationship between exposure to violence and antisocial behavior or moderated the relationship between exposure to violence and depression for Palestinian youth of the First Intifada (1987-1993). The study was a secondary analysis of a survey data that had been collected in 1998. Out of the 917 participants, 59% (N = 468) were males and 41% (N = 449) were females. Multiple regression procedures were utilized to analyze the data. The results showed that political affiliation and political imprisonment were not statistically significant moderators of the relationship between exposure to violence and antisocial behavior. Similarly, Political affiliation and political imprisonment were not statistically significant moderators of the relationship between exposure to violence and depression. Political affiliation and political imprisonment were statistically significant predictors of antisocial behavior. Exposure to violence was not statistically significant predictor of depression, but was statistically significant predictor of antisocial behavior. Recommendations were made for future research to increase the base knowledge on youth exposed to political violence.

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