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  1. GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Oct. 2016) [Download]

    Title: GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Oct. 2016)
    Author: GW Program on Extremism
    Description: Our monthly updates detail terrorisms-related activities and court proceedings in the United States.
    Keywords: Extremism, Terrorism, Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), Counterterrorism, National Security
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017
  2. Can Fiscal Budget Concepts Improve Regulation? [Download]

    Title: Can Fiscal Budget Concepts Improve Regulation?
    Author: Dudley, Susan E.
    Description: Despite efforts to ensure that new regulations provide net benefits to citizens, the accumulation of regulations threatens economic growth and well-being. As a result, the U.S. legislature is exploring the possibility that applying fiscal budgeting concepts to regulation could bring more accountability and transparency to the regulatory process. This paper examines the advantages and challenges of applying regulatory budgeting practices, and draws some preliminary conclusions based on successful experiences in other countries.
    Keywords: Regulation, Working Paper, Fiscal Budget, Public Policy, Regulatory Studies, Regulatory Policy
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017
  3. GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Oct. 2017) [Download]

    Title: GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Oct. 2017)
    Author: GW Program on Extremism
    Description: Our monthly updates detail terrorisms-related activities and court proceedings in the United States.
    Keywords: Extremism, Terrorism, Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), Counterterrorism, National Security
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017
  4. Whose Benefits Are They, Anyway? Examining the Benefits of Energy Efficiency Rules 2007 - 2014 [Download]

    Title: Whose Benefits Are They, Anyway? Examining the Benefits of Energy Efficiency Rules 2007 - 2014
    Author: Miller, Sofie E.
    Description: The Energy Policy and Conservation Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to establish energy efficiency standards for consumer appliances that are both technologically feasible and economically justified, while also resulting in a “significant conservation of energy.” To justify its regulations, DOE relies almost entirely on two specific types of regulatory benefits: the cost savings consumers are estimated to enjoy over the life of a more energy efficient appliance, and international benefits associated with reducing the impacts of climate change. To explore these benefits, this paper first examines the composition of benefits from energy efficiency regulations as reported by the Department of Energy over the past 10 years. It then examines arguments for and against inclusion of these benefits in regulatory impact analysis, including whether attributing large private benefits to energy efficiency rules is consistent with standard economic assumptions of consumer sovereignty, and the appropriateness of including international benefits in domestic rulemakings.
    Keywords: Regulation, Working Paper, Energy Efficiency, Public Interest, Public Policy , Regulatory Studies, Regulatory Policy
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017
  5. GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Oct. 2016) [Download]

    Title: GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Oct. 2016)
    Author: GW Program on Extremism
    Description: Our monthly updates detail terrorisms-related activities and court proceedings in the United States.
    Keywords: Extremism, Terrorism, Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), Counterterrorism, National Security
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017
  6. Regulatory Science and Policy: A Case Study of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards [Download]

    Title: Regulatory Science and Policy: A Case Study of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards
    Author: Dudley, Susan E.
    Description: When it comes to environmental regulation, no one is immune to the temptation to put a spin on science to advance a policy goal. While the media will decry the politicization of science – when political decision-makers attempt to distort what scientific studies conclude, problems also arise when scientists and others attempt to exert influence on policy decisions by selectively presenting, or even distorting, scientific findings (scientization of policy). This paper focuses on the scientization of policy, and defines and examines two contributors: the “positive-normative fallacy” (not acknowledging that science alone is insufficient to resolve normative policy questions) and “hidden policy judgments” (not acknowledging the policy judgments inherent in assessments of risk). It examines the process by which the Environmental Protection Agency sets National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) under the Clean Air Act to illustrate some of the perverse incentives involved in developing regulations, and offers possible mechanisms to improve those incentives and resulting policy.
    Keywords: Regulation , Working Paper, Environmental Policy, Public Policy, Regulatory Studies, Regulatory Policy
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017
  7. GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Nov. 2016) [Download]

    Title: GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Nov. 2016)
    Author: GW Program on Extremism
    Description: Our monthly updates detail terrorisms-related activities and court proceedings in the United States.
    Keywords: Extremism, Terrorism, Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), Counterterrorism, National Security
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017
  8. Learning from Experience: Retrospective Review of Regulations in 2014 [Download]

    Title: Learning from Experience: Retrospective Review of Regulations in 2014
    Author: Miller, Sofie E.
    Description: Through a series of Executive Orders, President Obama has encouraged federal regulatory agencies to review existing regulations “that may be outmoded, ineffective, insufficient, or excessively burdensome, and to modify, streamline, expand, or repeal them in accordance with what has been learned.” Evaluating whether the intended outcomes of regulations are met ex post can be challenging, so multiple government guidelines instruct agencies to incorporate retrospective review plans into their proposals during the rulemaking process. To support this effort, the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center examined significant regulations proposed in 2014 to assess whether they included plans for retrospective review, and provided recommendations for how best to do so. This paper finds that, despite these guidelines, agencies are not planning prospectively for ex post analysis of their rules and provides agencies with three recommendations to facilitate transparency, public accountability, and measurement of their rules’ success.
    Keywords: Regulation, Working Paper, Public Interest, Public Policy, Regulatory Studies, Regulatory Policy
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017
  9. GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Nov. 2017) [Download]

    Title: GW Extremism Tracker: Terorism in the United States (Nov. 2017)
    Author: GW Program on Extremism
    Description: Our monthly updates detail terrorisms-related activities and court proceedings in the United States.
    Keywords: Extremism, Terrorism, Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), Counterterrorism, National Security
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017
  10. Identifying Regulations Affecting International Trade and Investment: Better Classification Could Improve Regulatory Cooperation [Download]

    Title: Identifying Regulations Affecting International Trade and Investment: Better Classification Could Improve Regulatory Cooperation
    Author: Pérez, Daniel R.
    Description: Although technological and political innovations have reduced many of the traditional barriers to international trade and investment flows, regulatory differences between countries persist as lingering barriers to trade. Countries agree that notifying each other of upcoming regulations that may affect international trade and investment is an important mechanism of international regulatory cooperation, which attempts to minimize the creation of unnecessary and costly regulatory divergence. Since 2008 regulatory agencies in the United States have been required to flag regulations they intend to issue that are likely to have an effect on international trade and investment. This paper quantifies how many of the thousands of rules published every year by U.S. agencies are likely to have a significant effect on international trade and investment and analyzes how well agencies are performing at flagging these rules. The results indicate that there is much room for improvement in notifying trade partners and expanding stakeholder participation to improve the outcomes of rulemaking.
    Keywords: Regulation, Working Paper, International Trade, Investment, Regulatory Studies, Regulatory Policy
    Date Uploaded: 12/14/2017