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  1. A Retrospective Review of Retrospective Review [Download]

    Title: A Retrospective Review of Retrospective Review
    Author: Dudley, Susan
    Description: The scope and reach of regulation is growing, and along with it, public concern that there may be too much regulation of private activity. (See annual Gallup poll showing that more respondents are concerned about too much regulation than too little.) In response to this concern, President Obama issued two executive orders directing agencies “to determine whether …existing significant …regulations should be modified, streamlined, expanded, or repealed so as to make the agency’s regulatory program more effective or less burdensome in achieving the regulatory objectives.” The President noted, “during challenging economic times …it is particularly important for agencies to conduct retrospective analyses of existing rules to examine whether they remain justified and whether they should be modified or streamlined in light of changed circumstances, including the rise of new technologies.”
    Keywords: Regulation, Federal government, Commentaries, Regulatory policy, Regulatory studies, Public policy
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018
  2. Pace of New Regulations up in President Obama’s First Term [Download]

    Title: Pace of New Regulations up in President Obama’s First Term
    Author: West, Cassidy
    Description: Executive branch agencies are required by Executive Order and statute to measure the impact of regulations, using both ex ante and ex post analyses. Agencies conduct analyses that seek to quantify regulations’ costs and benefits, economic impact, and distributional effects, along with whether the regulation is meeting the policy goals of the President. Measuring the reach and impact of these regulations is difficult though, and analysts look to various proxies in an attempt to measure the effects of regulations over time.
    Keywords: Regulation, Federal government, Commentaries, Regulatory policy, Regulatory studies, Public policy
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018
  3. Will EPA’s Retrospective Review Reduce Burdens for the Regulated Public? [Download]

    Title: Will EPA’s Retrospective Review Reduce Burdens for the Regulated Public?
    Author: Miller, Sofie
    Description: In a 2011 report, the Environmental Protection Agency projected that its retrospective review efforts would save $1.5 billion over five years, but are the American people getting what the Agency promised? A recent working paper by the GW Regulatory Studies Center suggests that the unprecedented cost savings and burden reductions that many were hoping for won’t materialize at all—in fact, some of EPA’s retrospective review actions may even come with a hefty price tag.
    Keywords: Regulation, Federal government, Public policy, Regulatory policy, Commentaries, Regulatory studies
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018
  4. The Administrative Conference of the United States, 58th Plenary Session [Download]

    Title: The Administrative Conference of the United States, 58th Plenary Session
    Author: West, Cassidy
    Description: On June 13 and 14, 2013, the Administrative Conference of the United States (ACUS) will meet for its 58th Plenary Session. ACUS is an independent federal agency dedicated to improving the administrative process through “consensus-driven applied research, providing nonpartisan expert advice and recommendations for the improvement of federal agency procedures.” The Conference’s 101 members, who include federal officials, private practitioners, and academics with expertise in administrative law, will consider adoption of recommendations on 1) Social Security Disability Adjudication, 2) Benefit-Cost Analysis at Independent Regulatory Agencies, 3) Science in the Administrative Process, and 4) Administrative Record in Informal Agency Proceedings.
    Keywords: Regulation, Commentaries, Federal government, Regulatory policy, Public policy, Regulatory studies
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018
  5. A Review of Commerce’s Retrospective Review [Download]

    Title: A Review of Commerce’s Retrospective Review
    Author: Pino, Tatiana
    Description: On January 18, 2011, in Executive Order 13563, the President directed each agency to review its “existing significant regulations, and consider how best to promote retrospective analysis of rules that may be outmoded, ineffective, insufficient, or excessively burdensome, and to modify, streamline, expand, or repeal them in accordance with what has been learned.” In response to this directive, the Department of Commerce published the preliminary plan for review of its regulations on May 26, 2011. Two major components of the plan included regulatory modifications by the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO). On January 13, 2013 Commerce published its latest progress report for retrospective review. According to this report, the BIS and USPTO made efforts to achieve their respective goals outlined in Commerce’s preliminary plan.
    Keywords: Regulation, Federal government, Commentaries, Regulatory policy, Regulatory studies, Public policy
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018
  6. New Paper on the Precautionary Principle [Download]

    Title: New Paper on the Precautionary Principle
    Author: Dudley, Susan
    Description: A new issue paper from the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST), released Monday, finds that while the “precautionary principle” (PP) “has superficial appeal on initial impression, …when put to the test [it] actually lacks the substance and content necessary to guide realistic risk decision making.”
    Keywords: Regulation, Commentaries, Federal government, Regulatory policy, Regulatory studies, Public policy
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018
  7. Congressional Hearing: Reducing Unnecessary & Costly Red Tape through Smarter Regulations [Download]

    Title: Congressional Hearing: Reducing Unnecessary & Costly Red Tape through Smarter Regulations
    Author: Pino, Tatiana
    Description: On June 26, 2013, the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee held a hearing on “Reducing Unnecessary and Costly Red Tape through Smarter Regulations.” The bipartisan Committee is evenly divided among members of the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, with an equal number of Republicans and Democrats. The witnesses included Professor Susan Dudley, Director of the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center; Dr. Michael Greenstone, Director of the Brookings Institution Hamilton Project and 3M Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Dr. Jerry Ellig, Senior Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University; and Dr. Robert Kieval, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of CVRx, Inc. The most striking aspect of the hearing was the degree to which Members and witnesses agreed that federal regulations need to be more cost-effective and better targeted at achieving their intended goals. Committee Chairman Representative Kevin Brady (R-TX) opened the hearing by noting, “There are too many [regulatory] loopholes, no uniform requirement across all agencies, a lack of standards with which to conduct the analysis, no check and balance against agency bias, no comparison of past analysis to real life impacts, and little recognition on the total burden on the economy of regulations. We must do better.” Vice-Chair Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) stated, “Americans expect and deserve a common sense approach to regulation; one that protects consumers and the public interest without stifling innovation and economic growth.”
    Keywords: Regulation, Commentaries, Federal government, Public policy, Regulatory policy, Regulatory studies
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018
  8. New Regulatory Agenda Lists Thousands of New Rules [Download]

    Title: New Regulatory Agenda Lists Thousands of New Rules
    Author: Miller, Sofie
    Description: What can the American public expect from federal regulators in the coming year? The biannual Unified Agenda of Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions, published last week, provides a first glimpse at upcoming regulations and, in a perfect world, offers citizens the chance to become involved in the rulemaking process before agencies make major decisions final.
    Keywords: Regulation, Commentaries, Federal government, Regulatory policy, Regulatory studies, Public policy
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018
  9. Should International Benefits Count? [Download]

    Title: Should International Benefits Count?
    Author: Sutter, Dan
    Description: Should federal regulatory benefit-cost analysis (BCA) include benefits realized by residents of other nations? When it comes to valuing the effects of climate change, the federal government has recently decided that it should. A May 2013 technical update of an interagency working group established a revised range of values agencies are expected to use for the social cost of carbon (SCC) in regulatory analyses. Based on the working group’s earlier guidance on this subject, the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) analysis of greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for 2017 and later cars and light duty trucks includes $126 billion in benefits, primarily carbon reductions, less than a quarter of which are domestic benefits.
    Keywords: Regulation, Federal government, Commentaries, Regulatory policy, Public policy, Regulatory studies
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018
  10. OMB’s Draft 2013 Report to Congress on Regulatory Costs and Benefits has Limitations [Download]

    Title: OMB’s Draft 2013 Report to Congress on Regulatory Costs and Benefits has Limitations
    Author: Dudley, Susan E.
    Description: The benefits and costs of regulations, individually and in the aggregate, are notoriously hard to measure. In an attempt to measure the size and scope of regulation, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) each year submits to Congress an accounting statement and associated report providing estimates of the total annual benefits and costs of federal regulations. According to a new GW Regulatory Studies Center comment submitted to OMB, OMB’s Draft 2013 Report to Congress on the Benefits and Costs of Federal Regulations (the Report) probably offers one of the most comprehensive estimates available on the expected benefits and net benefits (benefits minus costs) of federal regulation; but, as OMB acknowledges, it has limitations. The benefits reported both for fiscal year 2012 and over the last decade are dominated by EPA regulations that reduce fine particles (PM2.5) either directly or incidentally. OMB provides a good qualitative presentation of the many uncertainties surrounding the PM2.5 benefits, but it should go further. It should reveal to the public the effect of these uncertainties on the range of plausible benefits derived from regulations.
    Keywords: Regulation, Commentaries, Federal government, Regulatory policy, Public policy, Regulatory studies
    Date Uploaded: 03/31/2018